Health

Pills Dissolving In Water Reveal What Actually Goes On In Your Body 

by Kate Ryan

August 2, 2016
Source: YouTube, Macro Room

In a YouTube video recently shared by Macro Room, we get an up-close view of over-the-counter pills dissolving in water, revealing what actually happens when we consume pills while delivering a hefty dose of startling beauty. Macro Room, which aims to reveal “the hidden beauty of our world” through detailed videos, already has nearly 9,000 channel subscribers since launching its first video two weeks ago.

If you’ve ever wondered whether to go with tablets or gel capsules to stop a headache in its tracks, this video clues you in on their differences in delivery. While tablets crumble and erode like rapidly aging cement buildings, gel capsules seem to implode, gushing their contents like a pain-relieving jet stream.

Maybe you take ibuprofen to combat chronic headaches, or maybe you ritualize your heart-attack-preventing daily aspirin. While pills are probably the most common way to get drugs into your bloodstream, not all drugs are best delivered in pill form. Insulin, for example, cannot be taken orally because the molecules are too sensitive to withstand stomach acid and get destroyed before they ever make it to the bloodstream, Group Health reports.

Even with convenient drugstore medications, a lot has to happen for a pill’s chemical compounds to make it into your system and work appropriately. To ensure your body absorbs vitamin B12, for instance, many supplement manufacturers incorporate cyanocobalamin, an inexpensive compound containing cyanide molecules that force your body to break it down. But the first and arguably most crucial step in a pill’s life cycle is guaranteeing your body can unpack its contents.

Watch the video above to see these little dolls in action. And next time you pop one or two to deal with a subway car full of screaming babies, take a moment to consider the art happening within your own body.

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